Tag: Black America

Necessary Blackness EP 136- America’s Favorite Dad Released From Prison #BillCosby

The release of Bill Cosby due to prosecutorial misconduct is not a technicality. Only those not educated on legalese, also known as legal jargon, will say #BillCosby was let out on a technicality

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Necessary Blackness Ep: 120 – PLANDEMIC COVID-19 No Need To Panic

Necessary Blackness Podcast had the opportunity to interview Keidi Obi Awadu on his recently released book, “Panic: What the Coronavirus Pandemic Tells Us About the State of the World”. Brother Keidi spoke in-depth about the fear and anxiety caused by sensationalist news headlines giving misinformation on COVID-19. Rahiem Shabazz and Marci Li got a chance to speak to Black America’s most notable dissenting voice against the COVID-19 pandemic and why he is against vaccines.

Necessary Blackness Ep: 94 – Black Economic Empowerment

In this episode of Necessary Blackness Podcast, Rahiem Shabazz speaks about Black Economic Empowerment. When only 2% of all working Black Americans work for another Black person within their own neighborhood, which has been left marginalized and dependent on white ownership for economic survival. we are quickly becoming a permanent underclass in society. We explore our economic status before integration and why we are no longer collectively thriving as a race of people.

 

Necessary Blackness Ep: 90 Black Resistance & White Laws

Black Resistance, White Law

In this episode of Necessary Blackness Podcast, we discuss the Justice Department announcement that it would not be pursuing federal charges against Daniel Pantaleo, the NYPD officer accused of fatally choking Eric Garner, who was approached by police for allegedly selling loose cigarettes. The decision was apparently made by Attorney General William Barr himself after the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division favored an indictment while a competing faction in the New York office felt otherwise.
The announcement on Tuesday, five years after the incident, was nothing short of a disgrace. It’s a complete abdication of responsibility, and a slap in the face to any notion of justice, particularly for Black victims.

We also talk about the imprisonment of A$AP Rocky in Sweden and why the majority of Black America is not coming to his rescue. And last but not least we want to pay our respect to Sadie Roberts-Joseph, The 75-year-old community leader and founder of the city’s African American Museum who was brutally murdered in Baton Rouge.

Necessary Blackness Ep 88: Interview with Mr. Dan Moore Sr. of the Apex Museum

Necessary Blackness Podcast interviews Mr. Dan Moore Sr the founder of the Apex Museum. We spoke about the historical importance of the Museum and its cultural significance. We also discussed Reparation and the true meaning of liberation as it pertains to Black America.

 

For More Information on the Apex Museum: https://www.apexmuseum.org/

Necessary Blackness Ep: 87 Juries Have A Right To Nullify

In this episode of Necessary Blackness Podcast, Rahiem Shabazz explains why jury nullification is necessary to level the playing field in the criminal justice system for Black America.

Jury nullification generally occurs when members of a criminal trial jury believe that a defendant is guilty, but choose to acquit them anyway because the jurors also believe that the law itself is unjust,[1][2] that the prosecutor has misapplied the law in the defendant’s case,[3] or that the potential punishment for breaking the law is too harsh. Some juries have also refused to convict due to their own prejudices in favour of the defendant.[4]
Nullification is not an official part of criminal procedure, but is the logical consequence of two rules governing the systems in which it exists:
  1. Jurors cannot be punished for reaching a “wrong” decision (such as acquitting a defendant despite their guilt being proven beyond a reasonable doubt).[5]
  2. A defendant who is acquitted cannot be tried again for the same alleged crime in front of another jury.[6]
A jury verdict that is contrary to the letter of the law pertains only to the particular case before it. However, if a pattern of acquittals develops in response to repeated attempts to prosecute a particular offence, this can have the de facto effect of invalidating the law. Such a pattern may indicate public opposition to an unwanted legislative enactment. Likewise, a jury can convict a defendant even if no law was actually broken, although such a conviction may be overturned on appeal. Nullification can also occur in civil trials.

Necessary Blackness Podcast Ep: 80 – Current Event Monday

 

Necessary Blackness Podcast Goes Live. I got my co-host Marci Li in the studio. We want to speak to the family and discuss everything happening in Black America. We talk about everything from Jussie Smollett, R. Kelly, Kamala Harris etc.,

Kamala Harris: Criminal Justice Reformer or Defender of the Status Quo

After announcing her presidency for the United States, Kamala Harris is being questioned on her past record on mass incarceration as San Francisco’s district attorney and then as California’s attorney general. Most of her policies affected Black Americans and now she has to answer for her punitive-law-and order mentality. Those who experienced her wrath first hand are implying she is not the criminal justice reformer Black America is looking for. The criticism she received thus far on her policies are warranted and must be answered.

But, more importantly she has not specifically stated, what she will do for Black America. No longer is the Black vote to be taken for granted, we are asking for tangibles in 2020

Necessary Blackness Podcast explores Kamala Harris’ record on mass incarceration and the hyper-criminalization of Black men and her voting record while Senator. #Tangibles2020

Necessary Blackness Ep. 23: Fatherhood: A Son’s Hero & Daughter’s First Love

In this episode of Necessary Blackness Podcast, Rahiem Shabazz and Queen Funmi talks Fatherhood and what it means to Black America, the myth and lies that were debunked about Black fathers and the importance of the extended family.

According to the CDC 67% of Black dads who don’t live with their children see them at least once a month. Compared to 59% of White dads and 32% of Hispanics dads.

This episode explores the root of absentees fathers, which is due to racism, poverty and mass incarceration. From the Homestead Act of 1862 to the red-lining of Chicago.

 

 

Necessary Blackness Ep. 17: Dhoruba Bin Wahad – Militarized Policing & State of Black America

Dhoruba Bin Wahad, Necessary Blackness

This Wednesday, (4.26.17) at 6 PM on Necessary Blackness Podcast, Dhoruba Bin-Wahad former Black Panther Party, Black Liberation Army and also political prisoner, discusses the Militarized Policing of America, the state of Black America and the Stealth History of Revisionism.

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