Category: Necessary Blackness Podcast

Necessary Blackness Ep: 144- All Love Branding

Necessary Blackness Podcast interview, Love of All Love Kauai where she enlighten us about the teachings of Maseru Emote (江本 勝, and how human consciousness could affect the molecular structure of water. The belief that words contains emotional energies and vibrations became the impetus for starting a clothing line with a positive affirmation. coupled with the teaching of Emote. Listen as Love takes us on her journey as an entrepreneur and how the healing powers of water plays an important part of her life.

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Necessary Blackness EP 143- Red Pill Talks Facts Initiative & MART 125

Red Pill sat down with Necessary Blackness to talk about how MART 125 coincided with the golden era of “Hip-Hop” as it was evolving rapidly and how it was commodified as a lifestyle. He also discuses the Facts Initiative and what’s next for the Twin Pillars. Many don’t know the long and fought history of MART 125 in Harlem and how it was the epic center of Black consciousness shaped by hip-hop music. Red Pill breaks it down in this video.

Necessary Blackness EP: 142- Monetizing Gentrification & Building Black Ownership

Today, we interviewed TJ Loftin to the nuisance abatement laws in Atlanta and Los Angelos, which is nothing more than a gentrification strategy hidden under a different name. We also talked about what true Black ownership looks like.

The Meaning of Black August & Why Its an Annual Commemoration

During the month of #blackaugust we expresses solidarity Black political prisoners and prisoners of war. It’s supposed to be a month of sacrifice and self-discipline. From the outset it was aimed at strengthening the Black freedom struggle, within and beyond the walls of prisons. It’s a commemoration, not a celebration. #BlackAugust #PoliticalPrisoners #GeorgeJackson #JonathanJackson #mumia

Necessary Blackness Ep:141 – The Fight For Food Sovereignty

Our guest Omowale Afrika will talk about the need for food sovereignty and why this is of paramount concern and how you can join the movement. We also discussed the divide in the 60’s and 70’s between the Civil Rights Movement & The Freedom Fighters. He also discuss the importance of Baba Hannibal Afrik’s work and why it must be introduced to the current generation and to involve them in the fight.

In 1911, Black owned 16 million acres of land, as of 2017, we lost 90% which leaves us with 4.5 million acres. That represents 1/2 of 1% of all the available farm land in the country. By May off 2022, the value of land Blacks lost is $326 Billion.

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My Views On “The Woman King”

The Woman King follows Nanisca (Davis), the general of the Dahomey Amazons, and Nawi (Mbedu), an ambitious recruit in the Kingdom of Dahomey. The film will depict how the pair “fought enemies who violated their honor, enslaved their people, and threatened to destroy everything they have lived for. This is a false narrative created by Hollywood.

“The growth of Dahomey coincided with the growth of the Atlantic slave trade, and it became known to Europeans as a major supplier of slaves. As a highly militaristic kingdom constantly organized for warfare, it captured children, women, and men during wars and raids against neighboring societies, and sold them into the Atlantic slave trade in exchange for European goods such as rifles, gunpowder, fabrics, cowrie shells, tobacco, pipes, and alcohol. Other remaining captives became slaves in Dahomey, where they worked on royal plantations and were routinely mass executed in large-scale human sacrifices during the festival celebrations known as the Annual Customs of Dahomey.”

Check out the video where I go into depth on the screenwriter, director, and cinematographer being all non-black. I also touch on how the inclusion of the LBGQT agenda will possibly be infused in the storyline.

Necessary Blackness: Ep 140 The Social Contract is Broken and Void

Necessary Blackness Podcast caught up with Community Activist and Award-Winning Author, Kimberly Latrice Jones to discuss her latest book, How Can We Win: Race, History and Changing the Money Game That’s Rigged where she goes in depth about the economic disparities Black Americans have faced for generations and offers ways to fight against a system that is still rigged.

Before there was Barak Obama, there was Harold Washington, before Harold Washington there was Rudy Lozano.

Social Justice Warrior, Kimberly Latrice Jones gives us a history lesson on the great visionary Rudy Lozano, and talks about his unwavering dedication to amplifying the peoples voice, his assassination and the vision he set forth for others to follow. 

With the upcoming 37th year anniversary of the MOVE Movement bombing, Kimberly recalls the Philadelphia based group quest for justice and why its important to keep Mumia’s name alive.

Necessary Blackness Ep: 139 – Rizza Islam

Rizza Islam joins us in the studio to talk about everything from COVID-19 to the on going war between Russia and Ukraine. We also discuss the importance of land ownership and establishing generational wealth.

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